Antidiabetic Agent

Health: Soon An Anti-Aging Pill?

I would like to die young as late as possible,” wrote the novelist Marcel Prevost. This myth of eternal youth may be on the verge of becoming a reality. Last February, US researchers announced that they have been able to extend their lifespan by more than 20%of mice by eliminating part of their senescent cells – end-of-life cells, the number of which increases with age and releases toxic substances. Also, these rodents, cleaned of their “old cells,” were also healthier and developed fewer cancers. From there to imagine that we can tomorrow remove senescent cells in humans and delay aging, there is only one step! Even if the effects in animals are not always reproducible in humans. “This is a promising result because it shows that targeting a single cell subpopulation can delay the aging of an entire organism,” says Gilles Charvin, a CNRS researcher at the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Biology. And cell at the University of Strasbourg. The lead author of the study,

An Antidiabetic Agent Tested For Its Anti-Aging Effects

Another blow in 2015, the US Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized for the first time a clinical trial that will assess the effects in humans of a molecule, not on a given pathology, but on different aging-related diseases (cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cognitive impairment) as well as longevity. This is metformin, a known drug, used for sixty years against type 2 diabetes and has suspected anti-aging effects. If this test is conclusive, its leader NirBarzilai, director of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, hopes to have the FDA recognize aging as a new therapeutic indication. This would be a real turning point and would open the door to the development of other treatments by the pharmaceutical industry but also by new players like Calico, the Google subsidiary created in 2013 and dedicated to this quest for a “pill of youth.” The interests at stake are enormous and powerful lobbying is at work in the United States to get the green light from the FDA. “We can imagine that the first molecule” anti-aging “can be marketed in a decade,” says Hugo Aguilaniu, director of research at the CNRS and the Institute of Functional Genomics of Lyon, specialist longevity mechanisms. The interests at stake are enormous and powerful lobbying is at work in the United States to get the green light from the FDA. “We can imagine that the first molecule” anti-aging “can be marketed in a decade,” says Hugo Aguilaniu, director of research at the CNRS and the Institute of Functional Genomics of Lyon, specialist longevity mechanisms. The interests at stake are enormous and powerful lobbying is at work in the United States to get the green light from the FDA. “We can imagine that the first molecule” anti-aging “can be marketed in a decade,” says Hugo Aguilaniu, director of research at the CNRS and the Institute of Functional Genomics of Lyon, specialist longevity mechanisms.